Evening Tour of Bruny Island

Tawny Frogmouth Jenny Pearce
Tawny Frogmouth Jenny Pearce
Duration: 
3 hours
Overview: 

Be escorted by your guide to a Little Penguin and Short-tailed Shearwater rookery to view these birds returning to their burrows from the ocean after dusk. Penguins can be viewed during most of the year, but Shearwaters are only present between September and April. There is also the option of visiting other areas with your guide in search of some of Bruny Island's other nocturnal wildlife such as Tasmanian Pademelons and Eastern Quolls which are now only found in Tasmania, as well as Bennett’s Wallabies and Brush-tailed Possums both of which are also found in a rare near-albino colour morph on Bruny Island. Long-nosed Potoroo, Tawny Frogmouth and Southern Boobook are also possibilities, with an outside chance of seeing the endemic Tasmanian Bettong or the endangered Masked Owl. It is also possible to see the Southern sky in all it’s brilliance on a clear night, including the Southern Cross, Milky Way, Orion, various planets and maybe even the Aurora australis during more active solar periods.

Because the Bruny Island ferry does not operate at night, people taking this tour must stay on the island overnight.

 

Start Location: 
Bruny Island TAS
Australia
Finish location: 
Bruny Island TAS
Australia

Be escorted by your guide to a Little Penguin and Short-tailed Shearwater rookery to view these birds returning to their burrows from the ocean after dusk. Penguins can be viewed during most of the year, but Shearwaters are only present between September and April. There is also the option of visiting other areas with your guide in search of some of Bruny Island's other nocturnal wildlife such as Tasmanian Pademelons and Eastern Quolls which are now only found in Tasmania, as well as Bennett’s Wallabies and Brush-tailed Possums both of which are also found in a rare near-albino colour morph on Bruny Island. Long-nosed Potoroo, Tawny Frogmouth and Southern Boobook are also possibilities, with an outside chance of seeing the endemic Tasmanian Bettong or the endangered Masked Owl. It is also possible to see the Southern sky in all it’s brilliance on a clear night, including the Southern Cross, Milky Way, Orion, various planets and maybe even the Aurora australis during more active solar periods.

Because the Bruny Island ferry does not operate at night, people taking this tour must stay on the island overnight.